Many private clairvoyants also offer free samples, but you do need to take care. Psychics and clairvoyants are not regulated by any professional body, so there are frauds and fakes. Some free readings are truly free samples, but others may be “bait and switch” tactics. One of the most common tactics is to tell you that there is a “hex” or a “curse” on you that the psychic can remove if you pay them. In most cases, if a psychic or clairvoyant says you have a curse, particularly during a “free” reading, they are fraudulent, and you should stop the reading.
So, there you have it, my first (and probably last, since I'm apparently shitlisted) foray into psychic-busting. I'm not going to tell people to stop seeing psychics - if it makes you happy and you have the cash, go wild. Whether you go in as a believer or as a shithead like me, the psychics are the ones making bank, so either way, in the end, they win. And who knows, maybe I have a sister I don't know about whose birth and death dates I guessed right, in which case, I should set up my own psychic shop. I'm sure Emily would approve.
Ms. Lassez's first taste of the paranormal came a decade ago on location for a film in Detroit, when -- on a whim -- she dropped in on a tarot reader to get her mind off a breakup and an argument on the set. The psychic spread out 10 cards on the kitchen table in a Celtic cross, a standard tarot pattern. The 10th card, which supposedly augurs the subject's future, was the Star. To any young actress the meaning would be clear. By the time she left Detroit, she had her own tarot deck.
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